Saturday, 28 November 2015

Haruki Murakami on travelling light (and just getting up and going)


When I’m travelling, I like to read Haruki Murakami. I like the clean writing style of his books, but also their otherworldliness. Last weekend I spent two nights in Chamonix, travelling over the Swiss border into France, and finished up A Wild Sheep Chase before getting the train home.

It was a good case of reading material matching my environment: as the snow tumbled down in the Alps to kick off the ski season, Murakami’s protagonist was holed up in a run-down house as the first snow fell. If he waited on the hill much longer, he’d be stuck there for winter.

I highlighted one excellent paragraph at the start of the novel that's on travelling. In particular, it’s about packing light and deciding to just get up and go. Here it is:

Boarding a long-distance train without any luggage gave me a feeling of exhilaration. It was as if while out taking a leisurely stroll, I was suddenly like a dive-bomber caught in a space-time warp. In which there is nothing: no dentist’s appointments, no pending issues in desk drawers, no inextricably complicated human involvements, no favors demanded. I’d left that behind, temporarily. All I had with me were my tennis shoes with their misshapen rubber soles. They held fast to my feet like vague memories of another space-time.

It’s a good reminder not just to travel–and travel light–but to pop a Murakami novel in your bag before leaving. A Wild Sheep Chase is a great choice.


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